On a Train, Chased by a Storm

I scribbled down the composition of this piece while travelling from Huddersfield to Leeds one evening that the north of England saw some spectacular stormy weather. I have come back to it hoping to recreate the dramatic feeling of movement and height.

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It was nice to work whilst knowing I was aiming for the Tilda style, but I’ve got into the place where you’ve been staring at your work too long and no longer know what you think of it!

I do plan to try more like this, and refine how I work skies.

On a personal note, as this blog is about wellbeing and creativity; we have just moved into a larger flat where I have more light and room to spread out. I’ve been sewing a lot, sorting through old notes and sketching/painting more. The most important thing to me though is still missing due to medication: my writing. I feel like I’m getting closer, and I’ll post here as soon as I’m in my flow again. Having a comfortable living space is helping. I know that I can get too precious about my poetry and what I share, so I’ll try to refrain because it can inhibit my creativity. Any tips about getting back into a writing routine would be welcome!

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Style 3 – Tilda

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Similar to an illustrative style, these pieces are outlined and accented in pen, within controlled compositions of nature. I want them to feel relaxed, simple and almost childlike.

It’s taking some practice, and I don’t feel I’m quite there yet to produce the quality I’m aiming for in this style, but I hope it will be worth it when I get there. Your thoughts? Too simple?

September begins: my next ‘style collection’

 

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For now this one is named ‘Associate’. I would describe these pieces as being the ones where there is high contrast, a moody feel in blues and purples, recognisably organic shapes and motifs feature under an overall abstract and stylised approach –  using masking fluid and other ‘artificial’ manipulations like the diptych here. I want them to have severity and also depth, where possible.

What do you think? Does this successfully come through? These are fun to do, and relatively quick to come together after the conception of the idea.
Also, I moved house last week, so have a much better space for working, yay! Expect more on here from now. I feel freed up. I hope to write more soon too, just need to settle down. Does anyone else need their brain to catch up when they have something like moving house?

An Update on Paintings

I’ve been away for over a week so have been unable to post anything here. (I have been active on my Twitter! @SukyWhettam) Here are some small square practice pieces I’ve been making on my week away.

I was using Khadi paper here, a very absorbent, textured cotton paper that took a while to get used to. It did however make way for lovely soft blending since the paper stayed wet for so long. I’m happy with the effect produced on the Tree Trunk, and also enjoyed using pen to provide a children’s illustration feel against the matt gouache in the Smoke and Garden pieces.

A big risk with this paper was overworking it, so these were worked quickly and kept as simple as possible. I’m happy to work like that because it keeps it fresh, even if it does mean I’m not perfectly pleased with all these pieces produced. I can always come back to the original idea again and redo it. It was great practice and nice to work in a different setting for the week.

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Let me know what you think!

Painting: Wet-on-wet

I’ve not had the easiest week, and definitely not the best for writing, but in terms of painting I’ve had some fun experimenting so I thought I’d share that with you.

I’ve been enjoying playing with wet-on-wet techniques and then going in on the dry layer with a fairly dry, heavily pigmented brush. The results had varying levels of success! I’m wondering what you guys with think of them.

 

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This sea scene was all wet work for the sky, water,landscaping and then I went back through with a drier brush for the details on the posts and the layers of grasses, trying to get the sense of depth. How do you think I did? I know there’s a lot I can do by way of precision and realism, but I like the wild feel it has, like it’s windy and damp.

It’s quite a lot of fun to do this technique, pulling the pigment around on the paper, it’s fast, and you don’t know quite how it’s going to turn out until the end. It’s great for practising.

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And I painted this yesterday after meeting a ladybird on my way home from Morrisons.. I’m quite happy with the two little bits of shine, one on the lady, and one on the bottom of the green leaf. In future I’m going to prepare my palette and colours ahead of time, so the colours are closer in relation to each other, I think that would achieve better cohesion.

I’m still playing with ideas around the style I showed you last week (the pears and oranges), so watch this space. I know this posts more naturalistic approach isn’t my forté  but I think it’s worth working on. I sometimes like to take the same subject and reproduce it in many ways, so I still might do that with the leaves.

I hope you’re all having a wonderful week, and find something fun you can do.